International award for simulation in healthcare education

The Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences has received an international award for its work with simulation-based learning in healthcare education. In the unique education centre Clinicum, students train using true-to-life simulations, often in multiprofessional groups.

 See the unique education environment at Clinicum (video in Swedish) 

Clinicum is a training and simulation centre in the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences that enables students to practise skills in a teaching situation as close as possible to an actual hospital. Several treatment rooms, waiting rooms and ER rooms are located along the corridor. The centre has an advanced robot, SimMan, controlled from a separate room by an instructor who sees everything that happens. Other rooms allow students to practise skills using realistic simulators, practise preparing medication, and work on their communication skills in meetings with fictive patients (often played by retired people). Students receive feedback after the session from teachers and other students who have been observing, such that they can convert experiences into knowledge.

It is, of course, also possible to view simulations on computer monitors, and the equipment at the centre includes an advanced simulation table used for education in anatomy and pathology.

Hands-on and teamwork

The Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences offers seven programmes for the education of future healthcare personnel. Right from the start, these programmes have relied on problem-based learning (PBL), and students taking different programmes study together in several courses. The skills training carried out at Clinicum plays a key role in this.

“The students practise in simulated true-to-life environments. They experience various patient scenarios together with an instructor, and they also have reasonably free access to the premises and equipment to practise on their own. Clinicum also emphasises strongly collaboration between students from different educational programmes. The idea behind using interprofessional learning is to promote the ability of students to collaborate in their subsequent professional lives, which benefits patients,” says Samuel Edelbring, manager of Clinicum.

The faculty’s work with simulation-based learning has now been rewarded by the 2017 ASPIRE Award of Excellence in Simulation. The strengths emphasised by ASPIRE include the wide range of available simulations, the intense student commitment, and the systematic support available for teachers giving the various programmes.

“The award is a mark of excellence and recognition of the people who have been pioneers in developing high-quality activities here,” says Samuel Edelbring.

International recognition

The international organisation ASPIRE has assessed excellence within higher education for the healthcare professions in various areas since 2013. One such area, new in 2017, is simulation.

“This award is evidence for the quality of the education that Clinicum and the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences offer. We are extremely proud of the opportunities to simulation that students experience at Clinicum – opportunities that ensure that they are better prepared for their future professional roles,” says Margareta Bachrach-Lindström, pro-dean at the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.

Institutes of education put themselves forward for consideration, and the applications are examined by several independent experts in the field. This is the second time that a Swedish university has received an ASPIRE award. Uppsala university received an award for excellence in student engagement in 2015.

The ASPIRE awards will be presented on 28 August at the Association for Medical Education in Europe (AMEE) conference in Helsinki.

Simulation-based learning

A trauma care simulation could look like this:

students practising trauma care at Clinicum

Students at the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences practising trauma care in a simulation at Clinicum. Photo: Johan Jäger

students practising trauma care in simulation exercise

Students at the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences practising trauma care in a simulation at Clinicum. Photo: Johan Jäger

student practising trauma care in simulation exercise

Students at the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences practising trauma care in a simulation at Clinicum. Photo: Johan Jäger

students practising trauma care in simlation exercise

Students at the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences practising trauma care in a simulation at Clinicum. Photo: Johan Jäger

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