Major EU grant for research into regional innovation

Together with six other European institutions of higher education, Linköping University has been given the go-ahead for a project designed to reinforce the role of the universities in innovation and regional development. The total grant is approximately SEK 35 million.

Photo credit: Gran BillesonTogether with six other European institutions of higher education, Linköping University has been given the go-ahead for a project designed to reinforce the role of the universities in innovation and regional development. The total grant is approximately SEK 35 million.

The idea is that young innovation researchers are to obtain tools that will prepare them to work with regional development. Fourteen doctoral students are participating in the project. Each one is to be based at one of the participating institutions of higher education, and will spend a couple of extended periods visiting another institution or organisation in the network where they will also have an assistant supervisor.

The three years of the project (2017-19) will see many seminars, workshops and conferences carried out.

Two of the doctoral students are based at Linköping University, which will, in addition, receive and supervise a further pair of students. Professor Magnus Klofsten (photo) and Senior Lecturer Dzamila Bienkowska of Linköping University are participating as supervisors in the project.

In addition to Linköping University, the universities in Stavanger, Norway; Ålborg, Denmark; Lincoln, Great Britain; Twente, The Netherlands; Aveiro, Portugal; and Barcelona, Spain are taking part. All of them (except for the University of Lincoln) are members of a network for innovative universities known as “ECIU” (the Europe Consortium of Innovative Universities). Other bodies active in regional development in the various countries are also participating in the project, which is being coordinated from the University of Stavanger.

The money is being granted from one of the sections of the EU Framework Programme for Research and Innovation (Horizon 2020). Only 7% of applications for grants were successful.

“It’s marvellous that our project has been granted funding, against such stiff competition. I’m really looking forward to the collaboration,” says Professor Magnus Klofsten.