A week in the life of a design student

“Save the data from one week of your life and visualise it.” This was the task given to the seven students taking the elective course “Advanced Visualization Design” as part of the new master’s programme in design. The results were a wide range of exciting posters, full of information. 

Big interest for the poster session at Design Talks

“We get a glimpse into a person’s life and we achieve deeper contact than if we just went for a coffee together,” says Jonas Löwgren, professor of interaction and information design in the Division of Media and Information Technology, as he introduces the exhibition during a break in the annual Design Talks at LiU.

“This is the first project during the first term of the first course, and the students really have succeeded,” he says.

Twelve students from different parts of the world were admitted to LiU’s completely new international master’s programme in design. Around half of them chose the “Visual Media” track, with the others being roughly evenly distributed between the “Transformative Service” and “Sustainable Futures” tracks.

Feelings abroad

Meike Reminger’s poster shows the feelings she has experienced when moving to a completely new country. We see where she has been, what she has done, and how she has felt. A very friendly policeman (after her mobile was stolen) and a bus that didn’t stop to pick her up simply because she remained sitting down are two of the memories in her: “Moving to a new country – Feeling home or feeling foreign”.

Word cloud designed by Hanna NordenöWord cloud designed by Hanna Nordenö Photo credit: Monica WestmanHanna Nordenö divided the week into what she had talked about and what she had experienced, and then added her emotions: exhilarated, safe, entertained or worried. The result is a revealing word cloud with many depths. Most of her time has been devoted to her studies and analysing food waste, since the latter is the subject of the other main project the students are conducting.

“Well, it’s not surprising really: it’s natural that most things are centred on the university and my studies in the beginning,” she says. And there’s a place also for her boyfriend, a helicopter pilot.

Societal needs

Ola Karlsson’s background is in software development and consultancy, and he decided to check what his smartwatch registered while he was asleep. He then compared this with how he felt in the morning – happy and relaxed, or tired and miserable. Tidy diagrams and curves reveal the correlation between a good night’s sleep and well-being.

Evan Palangio measured how much he communicated face-to-face and compared it with text communication, measuring also the duration of the conversation or contact, while Sarah Glassner, inspired by the food waste project, studied how much waste she deals with during a week, and determined whether it would have been possible to avoid the waste by better planning.
She’s rather surprised that we no longer refill glass bottles in Sweden, and she was disturbed to find that what she thought were glass bottles turned out to be plastic – she could have avoided buying them if she’d known.

“I’m proud of the students’ achievements after just a couple of weeks on their international master’s programme. They come from different places in the world, with completely different backgrounds and have got to grips with real societal problems,” says Jonas Löwgren.

Some of the posters

Hanna Nordenö

Hanna Nordenö Jonas Löwgren

Meike Remiger about feelings in a new country

Meike Remiger about feeling home or feeling foreign in a new country. Monica Westman

Evan Palangio shows his communication, in the back Meike Remiger

Evan Palangio measured how much and how he communicated  Monica Westman

Sarah Glassner studies how much waste she deals with

Sarah Glassner shows how much waste she deals with during a week. Monica Westman

Ola Karlsson explores a good night’s sleep and well-being

Ola Karlsson compares sleep and well-being. Monica Westman

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