Exclusion and Inequality in Late Working Life

EIWO - exklusion and inequality in later working life.
Lars-Christer Hydén

EIWO - Exclusion and Inequality in Late Working Life – Evidence for policy innovation towards inclusive extended work and sustainable working conditions in Sweden and Europe - pushes the boundaries of knowledge about late work and the potential of its inclusive and equal prolongation - it provides evidence for ageing work and life course policies.

EIWO addresses late work and its inclusive and equal prolongation, and it focusses on life course, agency, workplaces, branches, and economic conditions. EIWO identifies perspectives of life-course policies, life-long learning processes and flexible adaptation to non-work activities to prolong working lives and to avoid increased selective exclusion and inequality.

More information about EIWO.

EIWO is funded by the Swedish Research Council for Health, Work and Welfare (Forte)within the national research programme on working life.

 

About EIWOShow/Hide content

Ageing societies need to extend working lives and EIWO pushes the boundaries of knowledge about late working life and the potential of its inclusive and equal prolongation.

This is done via a theoretically driven, gender-sensitive combination of multi-level perspectives.

A life-course approach

EIWO takes a life-course approach on exclusion and inequality by security of tenure, quality of work, workplaces and their consequences. EIWO identifies life-course policies promoting life-long learning processes and flexible adaptation to prolong working lives and to avoid increased exclusion and inequality.

Five objectives of EIWO

It provides evidence for policies to ensure both individual, company and societal benefits from longer lives, and it has five objectives:

  • To produce new knowledge on chances and limits of longer working lives through investigating nature, sources and effects of exclusion and inequalities in Sweden and Europe with a focus on workplaces as the decisive level to realise late exits in practice
  • To assess policy, institutional and corporate-level influences on unequal employment chances and life-long learning opportunities, security levels and their impact on late work trajectories.
  • To gain an in-depth understanding of how earlier life courses influence and structure perceptions and accumulations of inequality and disadvantage
  • To inform Swedish social and employers’ policies for inclusive and fostering labour markets by an enhanced understanding of alternative practices within Europe
  • To propose policies to minimise risks that cumulate over the life course and to mitigate exclusion and inequalities in late working life
  • The programme builds on current and previous research as well as on an international network of senior and junior scholars. Added value comprises theoretical advances, methodological innovation and impact on EU- and national labour market and branch- and company policy.

Research and international scholars

The programme builds on current and previous research as well as on an international network of senior and junior scholars. Added value comprises theoretical advances, methodological innovation and impact on EU- and national labour market and branch- and company policy.

EIWO partnersShow/Hide content

The programme builds on an international network of senior and junior scholars.

Jagiellonian University, Cracow, Poland

Prof. Dr. Jolanta Perek-Bialas
Institute of Sociology

Linköping University, Sweden

Dr. Indre Genelyte
Division Ageing and Social Change
Department of Culture and Society

Annika Heuer
Division Ageing and Social Change
Department of Culture and Society

Dr. Lina Homman
Division Ageing and Social Change
Department of Culture and Society

Dr. Susanne Kelfve
Division Ageing and Social Change and Division of Social Work
Department of Culture and Society

Prof. Dr. Andreas Motel-Klingebiel

Division Ageing and Social Change
Department of Culture and Society

Gülin Öylu (from Sept 2021)
Division Ageing and Social Change
Department of Culture and Society
 

University of Sheffield, United Kingdom

Dr. Liam Foster
Department of Sociological Studies

Prof. Dr. Alan Walker
Department of Sociological Studies

University of Vechta, Germany

Prof. Dr. Frerich Frerichs
Institute of Gerontology
Department of Ageing and Work

Dr. Laura Naegele
Institute of Gerontology
Department of Ageing and Work

Technical University Dortmund, Germany

Prof. Dr. Gerhard Naegele
Institute for Gerontology

Prof. Dr. Monika Reichert
Faculty of Educational Research, Psychology and Sociology

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