Get to know us

Linköping University - with the courage to think freely and innovate. Show/Hide content

That is our vision. By thinking freely and innovating, we take on the challenges of the day. Resolute on our path, we know that together our actions, large and small, contribute to a better world. Meet some of us who work here and contribute to our vision in different ways.

Employees in numbers Show/Hide content

4 269

We are 4 269 employees at LiU.

52/48

We are 52 percent women working here and 48 percent men.

46

The average age is 46 years.

4 269

We are 4 269 employees at LiU.

52/48

We are 52 percent women working here and 48 percent men.

46

The average age is 46 years.

1 635

1 635 teachers and teaching assistants work here. 

638

638 PhD students work here.

1 513

1 513 employees work with administrative support.

1 635

1 635 teachers and teaching assistants work here. 

638

638 PhD students work here.

1 513

1 513 employees work with administrative support.

Who we are, what we do, and a little bit of what makes us proud Show/Hide content

A great prize for a great effort Show/Hide content

The most important thing that a university does is to educate people, and teachers who stimulate others to learn are worthy of all the encouragement we can give them. We want in this way to demonstrate that teachers are just as important to a university as researchers.
Ingemar Ingemarsson, Professor Emeritus at LiU and the person who founded the Ingemar Teaching Prize.

Meet three of our 341 professors Show/Hide content

Claes Lundström is an adjunct professor of medical visualisation

Medical pictures are a central part of healthcare 

Diagnostics and choosing treatments are often based on visual examinations with X-ray or microscopy. These pictures are extremely information rich, which is a big asset, but it also means that they are time consuming and hard to interpret. Medical visualisation involves supporting doctors and healthcare staff to help them use big data to make decisions.

 

Anna Storm is professor of technology and social change

Post-industrial landscapes and how they change, both physically and in peoples’ consciousnesses

This might be shut-down factories which have been given a new purpose, or abandoned facilities which in their decline can express both powerlessness and a romantic ruins aesthetic. It might also be polluted and dangerous places – ones which highlight the unequal choices we face when choosing where we live.

 

Neil Lagali is professor of experimental ophthalmology

With advanced laser microscopy, he examines patients with eye problems to find changes on the cell level in the cornea

Eye diseases cause blindness in millions of people around the world. In order to have good vision, light must be able to enter the eye and pass unimpeded through the cornea, which is the outer window of the eye. Good optics and a clear window are central to our vision.

 

What it's like living and working in Sweden and at LiU? Show/Hide content