64 million SEK for research in the natural sciences and technology

Seventeen researchers working in technology and the natural sciences at Linköping University have been awarded 64 million Swedish kronor in the form of research grants from the Swedish Research Council.

Per Eklund in the lab. Per Eklund, associate professor of thin film physics, has received 4.8 million kronor. Peter Holgersson

It was announced on Thursday which technology and natural sciences researchers are to receive new research grants from the Swedish Research Council. In total, 1.2 billion Swedish kronor was awarded for the years 2021-2025.

Grants have been awarded to research at Linköping University looking at, among other things, medical technology, nano technology and materials chemistry. Five researchers from Linköping University have been granted 20 million kronor in startup funds:

Emma Björk, associate professor at the Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM) has received four million kronor for a research project on constructing mesoporous particles and silicon dioxide films using controlled decomposition.

Hanna Jonasson, assistant professor of medical technology, has received four million kronor for research into microcirculatory dysfunction as a predictor of cardiovascular disease.

Johan Karlsson has received four million kronor for research into mRNA-based cancer vaccines using polymer-based delivery.

Xiao-Ke Liu, assistant professor at IFM, has received four million kronor for research into highly efficient carbon quantum dot-based light-emitting diodes with delayed fluorescence.

Davide Sangiovanni, assistant professor at IFM, has received four million kronor for research into ceramic materials with improved toughness under high temperatures.

Twelve researchers from Linköping University who have also been given Swedish Research Council grants totalling 44 million kronor:

Petter Dyverfeldt, associate professor at the Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, has received 3.8 million kronor for a project focussing on a new method of angiographic quantification and visualisation of turbulent blood flows using MRI.

Per Eklund, associate professor of thin film physics, has received 4.8 million kronor for a project looking at multi-component and nanolaminated nitrides in thin films for tailored thermal and electrical properties.

Frank J. Hernandez, associate professor at IFM, has received just over four million kronor for a project on the production of oligonucleotide probes for use in making antibiotics.

Peter Jonsson, professor at the Department of Computer and Information Science (IDA), has received 3.7 million kronor for a project on constraint satisfaction problems over infinite domains.

Jan Nordström, professor of applied mathematics, has received 1.7 million kronor for a project on adaptive calculation methods using neural networks for effective simulation of complex physics.

Justinas Palisaitis, principal research engineer at IFM, has received 4 million kronor for surface modification of new 2D materials.

Nikolaos Pappas, associate professor of communications and transport systems, has received 3.8 million kronor for a project on communication for network-based intelligent systems.

Per Persson, professor of thin film physics, has received 3.4 million kronor for a project on nanotechnology.

Yuttapoom Puttisong, associate professor at IFM, has received 4 million kronor for a project on electronic and photonic materials.

Kostas Sarakinos, associate professor at IFM, has received 4 million kronor for a project on the nanodesign of 2D metal contacts on 2D materials.

Stefan Stenfelt, professor of technological audiology, has received 3.4 million kronor for a medical technology project looking at improved hearing with bone-anchored hearing aids.

Teresia Svensson, associate professor at the Environmental Change section of the Department of Thematic Studies, has received 3.4 million kronor for a project on exposure to halogenated organic compounds through food.


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