06 April 2022

On 2nd April 2022 the event “Reclaiming Futures – Storying Change Science/Environmental Humanities/Anthropocene Festival” took place at the art centre Färgfabriken in Stockholm.

Panel discussion during the
Panel discussion during the "Reclaiming Futures – Storying Change Festival". Marietta Radomska

During the festival, teenagers and researchers engaged in conversations on climate change, environmental issues and our relationship to ecology. There, young people-turned-filmmakers and artists showed their work dealing with these key issues. The festival programme was curated and produced by the teenagers themselves.

The festival was arranged as part of the research project ”Reclaiming Futures: Storying Change”, which explores new forms of scientific communication and telling stories about the environment through the joint work of high school students, artists, curators and researchers.

In Reclaiming Futures youngsters and researchers, teachers, film makers, artists, curators and science journalists participate with their special insights into climate- and research communication. During 2021 and 2022 the teenagers and researchers convened for workshops and conversations on today´s climate and environmental situation. The youngsters were trained in cultural communication and taught how to formulate their own stories by images and film making, later to take form in a number of short films and stories of their own making.

Reclaiming Futures is a joint effort of partners: Konsthallen Färgfabriken, The Posthumanities Hub, Kajman Media and KW Produktion. It has also been supported by FORMAS.

More info and images from the festival

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